Rent


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The Secret Agent Report - Rent

February 2015

Rent

Rent (Download PDF)

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Land monopoly is not only monopoly, but it is by far the greatest of monopolies; it is a perpetual monopoly, and it is the mother of all other forms of monopoly.”
– Winston Churchill 

In this latest report we look at the state of rents. This is a key issue for investors within the market. The changing cost of money has changed expectations around yield, while newly built supply has created greater choice for tenants. This is an important read for anyone looking to undertake an investment decision, or a potential home buyer looking to establish whether they should buy or rent.

We look forward to March’s report and getting the early indicators of 2015 to you in The Secret Agent Report. It’s one of the most interesting times in the property market in years.

Excerpt:

At Secret Agent we speak a lot about buying property, what to look for and how much value a certain characteristic might add. In light of a fresh new year, The Secret Agent Report considers property from a rental perspective. With more investors in the buying sphere than ever before, there has been an influx of available rental properties in the market, especially in the inner city and CBD itself. This has been compounded by the growing number of new apartment completions from 2012 to 2014 and continuing into 2015.

As uncovered by Secret Agent’s last report, sale prices of apartments have remained stagnant in many inner city suburbs over the past year. This, coupled with record low interest rates make attractive conditions for buyers to strike. However, investor sentiment of late seems to reflect concern about rental yields.

The number of people choosing to rent has increased over the past few years. With property expensive to buy, many first home buyers are being forced to continue renting for longer periods than they would have in previous generations. People are relocating for work more than ever and may prefer the flexibility of renting. Furthermore, there is a continuous influx of foreign students coming to Melbourne to study each year, as well as increased immigration levels. There are plenty of people wanting to rent. The question is: can demand still keep up with newly built supply?

A few years ago there would be crowds lining up for an open for inspection, most people holding their applications in hand already prepared to submit on the spot. Competition was tough.

Now tenants have a lot more choice and with choice they can be more selective. Open houses are less frequently attended and applications come in days later.

There are of course exceptions for properties in well located areas, especially quality houses. The reduced competition seems to have put rental prices on hold. If owners choose to increase the rent, they risk having their property vacant for long periods. This has resulted in many tenants not experiencing a major increase in their weekly rent over the past 12 months.

This report will take an analytical look at the rental situation in Melbourne’s inner city suburbs. In particular we look at the annual growth in rents, the turnover of apartments leased out and annual rental yields within each inner city region. All one and two bedroom apartments were included in the calculation of median prices if their weekly or monthly rents were advertised. Fully furnished apartments for short term leases were excluded from the study. To adjust for seasonality in the rental market, the report focuses on sales in the fourth quarter (October, November and December) of 2012, 2013 and 2014. It should be noted that the results listed are gross yields due to the variable nature of outgoings for each property. To obtain a net figure, one can extract 20% from the median rents. Also stamp duty is not taken into account in this analysis.

Due to the large numbers of student accommodation apartments in suburbs such as Carlton, Brunswick East and Collingwood, the results may be skewed in these areas.